Training and Events
Alcohol Action Ireland Annual Conference
"Girls, Women and Alcohol" will be the focus of Alcohol Action Ireland’s annual conference, which will take place on Tuesday, November 11, 2014, at the Westin Hotel, Dublin 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
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Transitions and Youth Mental Health
The 4th National One-Day Research Conference on Youth Mental Health will take place on World Mental Health Day, Friday, October 10, 2014, in Cork County Hall, Carrigrohane Road, Cork
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Irish Association of Suicidology Annual Conference
The 18th annual IAS conference will be held in Hotel Westport, Co. Mayo on Thursday and Friday, October 9 and 10, 2014, to coincide with World Mental Health Day.
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Reporting for Work under the Influence of Drugs and Alcohol – Employers Legal obligations
A one-day seminar held by the EAP Institute, taking place in The Maldron Hotel, Cardiff Lane, Dublin, on Tuesday, September 23, 2014
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Alcohol Headlines – National and International
Irish Alcohol Diaries 2013: New figures reveal 75% of alcohol is consumed as part of binge session
Alcohol and sport are inextricably coupled
RTE Six-One News Interview with Suzanne Costello, CEO of Alcohol Action Ireland
UK supermarkets minimise price rises for the cheapest alcohol when taxes are increased
We can no longer afford to accept our harmful relationship with alcohol as the norm
Minimum pricing of alcohol: what does the evidence say?
Our unhealthy view of drink is a pain for A&E
Harmful drinking ‘is norm in Irish society’
Alcohol misuse - Honesty must inform drink debate
Alcohol firms funding charities in order to gain political influence, claims study
Sports not for sale to the alcohol industry
Doctor's Orders: It’s not a man’s world when it comes to health
Last orders on student alcohol misuse
Prevention is so much better than the cure
Do we need a red card for alcohol advertising in football?
Delays in South Africa's plans to ban alcohol advertising
Belfast Box nightclub promotion encouraged reckless boozing
C&C Group resigns from industry lobbyist The Portman Group
Alcohol sponsorship: Doctors want to cut flow of liquor money in Kiwi sport
The Sobriety Diaries: What I learned in one month without alcohol
Opinion: The first step to fixing Ireland’s alcohol problem? Fight back against the drinks industry
More young revellers 'pre-loading'
Children of addicts have to 'cover up something sad'
Buckfast: Controversial tonic wine to be sold in cans for first time
As part of the Sobriety Diaries series, ‘The Irish Times’ invited readers to tell it about their relationships with alcohol. Here are some of the 100-plus responses
EU has responsibility to 'inform consumers' through alcohol labelling
Films which glamourise drinking 'encourage young people to consume more alcohol'
Government crackdown on student binge drinking 'doesn't go far enough', says Alastair Campbell
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Did you know?
More than half (54%) of 18-75 year old drinkers were classified as harmful drinkers which equates to 1.35 million harmful drinkers in Ireland read more »
News
Make your voice heard on alcohol harm
 
Are you concerned about alcohol-related harm?

Alcohol Action Ireland has made it easy for you, in just three simple steps, to contact your public representatives to express your concern regarding the level of alcohol-related harm in our society and the urgent need to address it, beginning with the swift and full implementation of the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill.

It is only through our legislators introducing evidence-based measures that we can reduce the burden of alcohol-related harm on our society, thereby improving health, safety and wellbeing for all.

Our legislators are constantly exposed to lobbying on this issue from corporate, vested interests who oppose all effective public health measures.

It's important that you make your voice heard too.


Take action
Banning alcohol sponsorship of sport It is not just supported by the evidence, it is the right thing to do
 

Alcohol sponsorship of sport is the keystone for a wide range of alcohol marketing activity in Ireland.

An array of marketing activities are used to leverage the link between alcohol, sports and elite athletes, which ultimately drives consumption of alcohol. Advertising “activates” the sports sponsorship to increase sales.

A ban on alcohol sponsorship of sport would decelerate the relentless promotion of alcohol in Ireland and diminish the overall potency of alcohol advertising, thereby reducing alcohol consumption.

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Irish women urged to put the health and wellbeing of their children first by not drinking alcohol during pregnancy
 

THE country’s three largest maternity hospitals have joined with Alcohol Action Ireland, the national charity for alcohol-related issues, to warn of the damage that can be caused to the unborn child by drinking alcohol during pregnancy.

 The National Maternity Hospital, The Rotunda Hospital and the Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital have said it is in a child’s best interests for a prospective mother not to drink alcohol while pregnant, due to the risk of damaging the physical and mental development of the unborn child – damage which can have serious, life-long consequences.

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Minimum pricing will lead to a reduction in alcohol-fuelled crime and save lives, Joint Committee on Justice, Defence and Equality hears
 

The introduction of minimum pricing will lead to reduction in alcohol-fuelled crime in Ireland and save lives, according to a leading alcohol policy expert.

 Professor Tim Stockwell told the Joint Committee on Justice, Defence and Equality that minimum pricing has led to a reduction in crime and deaths due to alcohol in Canada and would have similarly positive results if introduced in Ireland.

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Public health isn't a priority for profit-driven alcohol industry
Opinion piece for the Irish Independent by Suzanne Costello, CEO of Alcohol Action Ireland
 
For the first time, an Irish Government has decided to treat our harmful relationship with alcohol as a public health problem in an effort to bring about positive change in a society where binge drinking and drunkenness has become normal, accepted behaviour.  

The Public Health (Alcohol) Bill, being drafted by the Department of Health, represents an important first step in this regard. Of particular importance are those evidence-based policy measures that target the key areas of alcohol pricing, marketing and availability.

These measures are opposed by the alcohol industry for the simple reason that to reduce alcohol-related harm in Ireland we have to reduce our overall alcohol consumption, which is clearly not in its interest.

FOR the first time, an Irish Government has decided to treat our harmful relationship with alcohol as a public health problem in an effort to bring about positive change in a society where binge drinking and drunkenness has become normal, accepted behaviour. - See more at: http://www.independent.ie/opinion/analysis/public-health-isnt-a-priority-for-profitdriven-alcohol-industry-30112377.html#sthash.wa792wwS.dpuf
FOR the first time, an Irish Government has decided to treat our harmful relationship with alcohol as a public health problem in an effort to bring about positive change in a society where binge drinking and drunkenness has become normal, accepted behaviour. - See more at: http://www.independent.ie/opinion/analysis/public-health-isnt-a-priority-for-profitdriven-alcohol-industry-30112377.html#sthash.wa792wwS.dpuf
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Girls, Women and Alcohol
Girls, Women and Alcohol will be the focus of Alcohol Action Ireland’s annual conference, which will take place on Tuesday, November 11, 2014, at the Westin Hotel, Dublin 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

During the conference, expert speakers will examine the factors influencing alcohol consumption and drinking patterns among Irish girls and women, the health risks involved, as well as what we need to do to bring about a positive change to the current situation. Women will also share their personal experiences of alcohol with conference attendees.

Further details will follow and will be available through alcoiholireland.ie and through our Facebook and Twitter accounts.


Girls, Women and Alcohol will be the focus of Alcohol Action Ireland’s annual conference, which will take place on Tuesday, November 11, 2014, at the Westin Hotel, Dublin 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

During the conference, expert speakers will examine the factors influencing alcohol consumption and drinking patterns among Irish girls and women, the health risks involved, as well as what we need to do to bring about a positive change to the current situation. Women will also share their personal experiences of alcohol with conference attendees.

Further information will follow and will also be available on alcoholireland.ie

- See more at: http://alcoholireland.ie/home_news/save-the-date-alcohol-action-ireland-conference/#sthash.LFccUqUK.dpuf
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Research and Reports
Irish Alcohol Diaries 2013
 

Figures published by the Health Research Board this week confirm that Irish drinking patterns are harmful and almost one in fourteen drinkers meet criteria for dependent drinking. The figures were captured as part of the first National Alcohol Diary Survey involving almost 6,000 people, aged 18-75 years, across Ireland during 2013.


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Global status report on alcohol and health 2014
 

Ireland emrged as the country with the second highest levels of binge drinking in the World Health Organisation's Global status report on alcohol and health 2014, which provides a global overview of alcohol consumption in relation to public health (Chapter 1) as well as information on: the consumption of alcohol in populations (Chapter 2); the health consequences of alcohol consumption (Chapter 3); and policy responses at national level (Chapter 4).

Read the country profiles, including Ireland's, here and click "read more" below for the full report.

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Alcohol's harm to others in Ireland
 

This report, prepared for the HSE by Dr Ann Hope, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Trinity College, Dublin, outlines alcohol harm's to others in Ireland.

In Ireland, the burden of alcohol related harm is often experienced by those around the drinker, be they family member, friend, co-worker or innocent ‘bystander’. Alcohol’s harm to others (AH2O) undermines public safety and is experienced in every community. The negative effects from other people’s drinking are visible in the public domain and can range from the nuisance factor, feeling unsafe in public places to the violent attack by an intoxicated drinker. Physical assaults and driving a car while under the influence of alcohol can contribute to injuries, accidents, disabilities and death of innocent people. Although not often publicly visible, alcohol’s harm to others within the family can have very serious consequences for the safety and well-being of family members, with children being the most vulnerable.


his report, prepared for the HSE by Dr Ann Hope, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Trinity College, Dublin, outlines alcohol harm's to others in Ireland. In Ireland, the burden of alcohol related harm is often experienced by those around the drinker, be they family member, friend, co-worker or innocent ‘bystander’. Alcohol’s harm to others (AH2O) undermines public safety and is experienced in every community. The negative effects from other people’s drinking are visible in the public domain and can range from the nuisance factor, feeling unsafe in public places to the violent attack by an intoxicated drinker. Physical assaults and driving a car while under the influence of alcohol can contribute to injuries, accidents, disabilities and death of innocent people. Although not often publicly visible, alcohol’s harm to others within the family can have very serious consequences for the safety and well-being of family members, with children being the most vulnerable. - See more at: http://alcoholireland.ie/reports/#sthash.dHEUHngM.dpuf
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Like, Comment, Share - Alcohol brand activity on Facebook
 

By the end of 2012 the top 20 alcohol brands (brands) in Australia had more than 2.5 million followers on their Facebook pages. During 2012 they posted more than 4500 items of content. Their followers interacted with that content by liking, sharing or commenting on it more than 2.3 million times. These figures suggest that Facebook is now a key player in the promotion of alcohol. The alcohol industry has developed an extensive, real-time, culturally embedded mode of branding on Facebook. The sophisticated use of social media by brands identified in this research raises seven issues that are currently not addressed by existing regulation


By the end of 2012 the top 20 alcohol brands (brands) in Australia had more than 2.5 million followers on their Facebook pages. During 2012 they posted more than 4500 items of content. Their followers interacted with that content by liking, sharing or commenting on it more than 2.3 million times. These figures suggest that Facebook is now a key player in the promotion of alcohol. The alcohol industry has developed an extensive, real-time, culturally embedded mode of branding on Facebook. The sophisticated use of social media by brands identified in this research raises seven issues that are currently not addressed by existing regulation. - See more at: http://alcoholireland.ie/reports/#sthash.dHEUHngM.dpuf
By the end of 2012 the top 20 alcohol brands (brands) in Australia had more than 2.5 million followers on their Facebook pages. During 2012 they posted more than 4500 items of content. Their followers interacted with that content by liking, sharing or commenting on it more than 2.3 million times. These figures suggest that Facebook is now a key player in the promotion of alcohol. The alcohol industry has developed an extensive, real-time, culturally embedded mode of branding on Facebook. The sophisticated use of social media by brands identified in this research raises seven issues that are currently not addressed by existing regulation. - See more at: http://alcoholireland.ie/reports/#sthash.dHEUHngM.dpuf
 
By the end of 2012 the top 20 alcohol brands (brands) in Australia had more than 2.5 million followers on their Facebook pages. During 2012 they posted more than 4500 items of content. Their followers interacted with that content by liking, sharing or commenting on it more than 2.3 million times. These figures suggest that Facebook is now a key player in the promotion of alcohol. The alcohol industry has developed an extensive, real-time, culturally embedded mode of branding on Facebook. The sophisticated use of social media by brands identified in this research raises seven issues that are currently not addressed by existing regulation. - See more at: http://alcoholireland.ie/reports/#sthash.dHEUHngM.dpuf
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Content Analysis of Newspaper Reports on Alcohol-Related Deaths

Reports of confirmed alcohol-related deaths in Irish newspapers are failing to reflect the role of alcohol consumption in these fatalities, a new study has found.

The study by Dr John Fagan, Senior Registrar in Child and Adolescent psychiatry, Children’s University Hospital, Temple Street, Dr Suzi Lyons, Senior Researcher, Health Research Board, and Dr Bobby Smyth, Clinical Senior Lecturer in Addiction Studies, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin which has recently been published in the journal Alcohol & Alcoholism, looked at the newspaper reporting of alcohol-related deaths in Ireland over a two-year period.

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Your comments, suggestions and feedback in relation to any of the items in this newsletter are most welcome. Please email conor@alcoholactionireland.ie

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